SATYRICON

NEMESIS DIVINA

RE-RELEASED 20TH MAY 2016 (NAPALM RECORDS) DUE TO 20TH YEAR ANNIVERSARY


TRACK LISTING:

1) The Dawn Of A New Age

2) Forhekset

3) Mother North

4) Du Som Hater Gud

5) Immortality Passion

6) Nemesis Divina

7) Transcendental Requiem Of Slaves

 

OUR RATING
7.0
OUT OF 10

WORDS BY
PAUL CLARKE 

 


Born into the satanic, church burning Norwegian black metal scene in 1990, Satyricon (or Eczema as they were first known back then) were set to break gravestone ridden ground with their particular brand of middle ages themed music. "Nemesis Divina" (being 'Divine Nemesis' in Latin) has often been described as Satyricon's peak of excellence, hence why this Satanic two piece have had it remastered to celebrate 20 years since its release back in 1996.


One of the main differences between Satyricon and most of the rest of the Norwegian black metal bands out there is that they have eschewed crappy band logos and amateur photography in favour of clear typography and vibrant, if darkly themed album covers. This, as you can imagine once again broke corpse impregnated ground, and is possibly one of the key ingredients to their success.


Upon listening, the glossy packaging contains some darkly engaging material that is possibly as satanically pretentious as bands like Gorgoroth, but therein lie the many hooks that keep you listening like a victim of a succubus daemon that beckons you to it's embrace. Hecate Enthroned and Emperor have that similar effect, and you can see why these bands have an almost religious following.


Not really being able to pick apart any track from one to the next, they give me the impression that they are written more to create an atmosphere, rather than tell a story. Atmosphere appears in spades, and the medieval themes and flavours in the music are what really do it for me. My main gripe however, is a problem that many bands in this genre suffer from, this being some obvious and truly terrible double kick drumming. It doesn't quite throw the tracks completely out, but stands out enough to notice where the rhythm is compensated for. But then, it's not about the mistake, it's about the recovery right?


 NOTE: Video below in original release from 1996